Air Force Academy Takes Top Prize at University Corrosion-Detection Competition

By Cynthia Greenwood
DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office

The U.S. Air Force Academy cadets who won first prize at the University Student Design and Applied Solutions Competition include (from left) Ari Luzada, Mitchel Ble, and Andrew LeValley, joined by faculty sponsor Sarah Galyon-Dorman. (DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office photo by Cynthia Greenwood)

For the second year in a row, a United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) engineering student team won first prize for their corrosion-inspection system design and demonstration during the University Student Design and Applied Solutions Competition (USDASC). The event, sponsored by NACE International, took place at the NACE Training Facility in Houston, April 25-26, 2017.

Sarah Galyon-Dorman, a senior research scientist with SAFE, Inc., and the USAFA’s Center for Aircraft Structural Life Extension, oversaw the winning team’s efforts throughout the 2016-17 academic year.

Louisiana State University (LSU) students won second place at the University Student Design and Applied Solutions Competition. Pictured (from left) are LSU team members Mariou de Guzman, Rachel Doyle, and Andrew LeBlanc, joined by Chevron sponsor Syed Hussain. (DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office photo by Cynthia Greenwood)

A team of three students from Louisiana State University, led by Professor Gerry Knapp, received second place for their robotic corrosion-detection design.

The George Mason University team took third prize at the University Student Design and Applied Solutions Competition. Members include (from left) Sonoell Clark, Je Park, Andrew Schneider, Pisal Yim, and Daniel Howe. (DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office photo by Cynthia Greenwood)

Five students from George Mason University, overseen by Professor Robert Gallo and Professor Patrick Moran (advising from the U.S. Naval Academy), won third prize for their robotic system. Student teams from Alfred University and Texas A & M University also participated in the event.

“The University Student Design and Applied Solutions Competition is unique because it encourages students from disparate engineering disciplines to work together to design new technology for controlling and mitigating corrosion,” said Daniel J. Dunmire, Director of the DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office. The Corrosion Office founded the engineering competition during the 2015-2016 school year, through a partnership with NACE.

The 2017 USDASC challenged teams to develop a system for corrosion inspection in hard-to-reach areas. During the demonstration phase, each team was required to showcase its design, capable of operating autonomously while navigating and pinpointing defects inside a steel and aluminum structure. Each team, after placing its device inside a narrow structural opening, navigated the interior space in order to detect various types of corrosion, and thereby create a report for the judges.

The five teams presented their systems to three judges during an oral presentation and a hands-on demonstration. The judges included Harvey Hack, Ph.D., past president of NACE and senior advisory engineer at Northrop Grumman; Ron Latanision, Ph.D., emeritus professor at MIT; and Christopher Scurlock, Ph.D., a senior consultant at LMI and the executive secretary of the DoD Corrosion Office Technical Corrosion Collaboration.

RELATED LINKS: Researchers Rewarded for Preserving Legacy of DoD Aircraft & Ships
USNA Midshipmen Dazzle STEM Students

Follow the Armed with Science on Facebook and Twitter!

———

Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DOD website.