Researchers’ Achievements Align with DoD’s Future

By Terri Moon Cronk
DoD News, Defense Media Activity

Imagine being at the top of your profession and then imagine being recognized by the president for your achievements in that profession. This is what took place in February when President Barack Obama selected the winners for the coveted Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers.

Seventeen of the more than 100 award recipients are Defense Department researchers.

“Early career scientists are leading the way in our efforts to confront and understand challenges from climate change to our health and wellness,” the president said when the awardees’ names were announced.

President Barack Obama joins recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for a group photo in the East Room of the White House, May 5, 2016. White House photo by Lawrence Jackson

President Barack Obama joins recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for a group photo in the East Room of the White House, May 5, 2016. White House photo by Lawrence Jackson

DoD Awardees Contribute to Future

DoD’s awardees’ achievements align with numerous initiatives of Defense Secretary Ash Carter — such as support for Force of the Future, innovation and technology partnerships, enhanced cyber security, and the acceleration of countering global terrorism.

Some examples of future mission support are found in the work of Drs. Jin-Hee Cho, Heather F. Pidcoke and Anya Jones:

— Cho, of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, was cited for her fundamental contributions to the science of cyber trust, network security and tactical network applications, for her dedication to mentoring students, and for her leadership in the broader research community.

— Pidcoke, of the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, was cited for her fundamental contributions to developing safe and effective insulin infusion protocols for the care of critically ill patients — burn victims in particular – as well as for her dedication and leadership in applying multidisciplinary approaches to improving the care of combat casualties and her dedication to mentoring next-generation scientists.

— Jones, of the University of Maryland, was cited for her outstanding contributions to foundational research in aerodynamics and for her dedicated community service, through which she inspires young people from underrepresented groups to seek careers in science and engineering.

Established by then-President Bill Clinton in 1996, the awards program highlights the key role the federal government places on encouraging and accelerating American innovation to grow the U.S. economy and tackle its greatest challenges.

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