DoD Lab Day Features Safety & Intelligence Advancements

This week, we’re continuing to highlight the science and technology advancements happening within the Department of Defense. Last Thursday, DoD innovations were on display at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon. We’ve shown you the best of the Marines’ robots, the Army’s surgical simulation model, and the Navy’s wireless binocular system. Today, we’re taking a closer look at three more projects in development in the areas of safety and intelligence.

U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command’s Transport Telemedicine device is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command’s Transport Telemedicine device is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The U.S. Army’s Medical Research and Materiel Command has produced the Transport Telemedicine device to aid in providing a more complete treatment history for a patient’s medical record. The device records data on the patient’s physiological status from attached medical devices all while the patient is being transported to receive further medical care.

The device can be mounted inside an air or ground medical evacuation vehicle. It’s device-agnostic, meaning it successfully integrates with any medical device. The Army ensured the device also has a vocal data entry system that works effectively under the blades of an aircraft. There’s even a stylus or touchpad so medics may make easier entries without fear that the reader won’t be able to decipher the handwriting.

Developers say one of the Army’s most significant medical gaps is the inability to get a complete medical history on a patient through all the various stages of transfer and care. With this device, any medical treatment facility with the correct login can see what’s going on with the patient.

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Vantage Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (rear) is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. The Spider Unmanned Aerial Vehicle is pictured in the foreground. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory’s Vantage Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (rear) is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. The Spider Unmanned Aerial Vehicle is pictured in the foreground. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The Vantage Unmanned Aerial Vehicle was developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to support electronic warfare and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. The Vantage vehicle evolved from the Dragon Warrior vehicle, which was originally used for the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory to perform reconnaissance and communications relay missions. The Vantage vehicle features a heavy fuel-engine and an electric motor. The unmanned air vehicle is compact enough to fit in the back of a Humvee. The Vantage program completed in 2005 when an autonomous flight demonstration was performed. Since then, the Navy has moved forward with modifications to the vehicle to perform fully autonomous high-speed flights.

Naval Air Systems Command's Reusable Energy Attenuating Lab Seat is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

Naval Air Systems Command’s Reusable Energy Attenuating Lab Seat is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day held at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

Another Navy innovation, the Reusable Energy Attenuating Lab Seat (“REAL”) was developed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. Since helicopter seats are very expensive –ranging between $60,000 to more than $100,000 each– doing tests can be cost prohibitive for the Navy. The REAL seat gives Navy testers the same dynamics and quality of data as the expensive seats, but saves the Navy millions. This reusable energy absorbing seat can be used to simulate various crashworthy seating systems to ensure the warfighter’s safety. REAL seats are capable of up to 50 g’s of acceleration and 50 ft./second input velocity and can accommodate male and female service members.

Watch how the REAL seat works.

Tomorrow, we’ll conclude our look at the science and technological advancements from DoD Lab Day.

Yolanda R. Arrington is the content manager for Armed with Science. She is a journalist and social media-ista with a flair for moving pictures and writing.
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