DoD Lab Day Spotlights Military Advancements

“Technological superiority is not an American birthright.”

Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work opens the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: DoD News/Released)

Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work opens the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: DoD News/Released)

That was Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work’s message as he opened the inaugural DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon May 14, 2015.

Work said he firmly believes, as does Defense Secretary Ash Carter, that we “must continue to innovate to protect our country.”

It was a message of encouragement and gratitude for the work that scientists and researchers from around the services have done to make the U.S. military number one in scientific advancements and research. But, that pat on the back included a mission to press on to maintain that advantage.

Work said he was “jazzed up” to see the more than 100 innovations on display in the Pentagon courtyard. Starting today, we’ll highlight some of the great work the services and research laboratories are doing.

The U.S. Army's RDECOM Edgewood Chemical Biological Center's decontamination polymer, DeconGel, is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The U.S. Army’s RDECOM Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s decontamination polymer, DeconGel, is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, part of the Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command, at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland showcased DeconGel, a water-soluble and biodegradable decontaminant that reduces the amount of waste byproduct by 90 percent.

DeconGel works by encapsulating and binding contaminants to prevent the spread of hazardous chemicals and biological, radiological and nuclear materials. The blue polymer can be sprayed or brushed on and then peeled off after it dries, removing the contaminated materials. Once removed, the peels can be burned to finalize the decontamination process.

The Medical Simulation-based Training System for Rapid Trauma Skills Training by TATRC/Armed Forces Simulation Institute for Medicine (AFSIM) is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The Medical Simulation-based Training System for Rapid Trauma Skills Training by TATRC/Armed Forces Simulation Institute for Medicine (AFSIM) is displayed at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The Army’s Medical Research and Materiel Command is using groundbreaking science to train medics before they ever face emergencies in the field. The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center’s Medical Simulation-based Training System for Rapid Trauma Skills Training model helps medics and surgeons develop the skills they need to respond in catastrophic environments.

The simulated victim has a series of wound patterns reflective of an improvised explosive device blast. Surgeons practice a range of procedures, from performing a craniectomy to suturing wounds. The model actually stops bleeding when medics have successfully applied a tourniquet to its leg.

The Navy is making performing handiwork a bit easier. The Naval Surface Warfare Center in collaboration with the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division has developed the Industrial Human Augmentation System to help industrial workers manipulate power tools without actually bearing the weight of holding those power tools.

The NAVSEA/NAVAIR Industrial Human Augmentation System (iHAS) is demonstrated at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The NAVSEA/NAVAIR Industrial Human Augmentation System (iHAS) is demonstrated at the first-ever DoD Lab Day at the Pentagon to highlight military achievements in science and research, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Yolanda R. Arrington/Defense Media Activity/Released)

The wearable exoskeleton-based system transfers the weight of the tools to the ground, reducing strain and fatigue risks for the worker. Shipyard workers began testing the device in 2013, with more study and development expected in fiscal year 2017.

Those are just a few examples of the cutting-edge technology happening within DoD. Watch this space for highlights from the first-ever DoD Lab Day, as we’ll feature even more of the projects and products in development.

 

Yolanda R. Arrington is the content manager for Armed with Science. She is a journalist and social media-ista with a flair for moving pictures and writing.
Follow Armed with Science on Facebook and Twitter!
———-

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense. For other than authorized activities, such as, military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD website.