The U.S. Army is Beaming Data Up

Teleportation, a long-standing staple in the world of science fiction, has become a reality for scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in terms of battlefield data and image processing.

ARL quantum information principal investigator Ronald Meyers (right) and team member Keith Deacon (left) recently demonstrated information teleportation using entangled photons at the organization's laboratory in Adelphi, Md. (Photo provided by the Army Research Lab/Released)

ARL quantum information principal investigator Ronald Meyers (right) and team member Keith Deacon (left) recently demonstrated information teleportation using entangled photons at the organization’s laboratory in Adelphi, Md. (Photo provided by the Army Research Lab/Released)

ARL quantum information principal investigator Ronald Meyers and team member Keith Deacon recently demonstrated information teleportation using entangled photons at the organization’s laboratory in Adelphi, Md.

This achievement stems from quantum information science insight and quantum information processing technology that has been developed over the last two years by Meyers and his team.

The technology developed includes an information teleportation exfiltration testbed and a teleportation exfiltration approach to move quantum images securely, which is a significant achievement as current secure network communications are increasingly vulnerable to eavesdropping and eventual hacking with the use of ever more powerful computers.

The team has developed a prototype information teleportation network system as part of the testbed to quantify teleportation of information using eye-safe entangled photons, thus showing potential for secure teleportation over optical fiber or through free-space.

In entangled photon-based teleportation, a photon carrying potentially many bits of information interacts with one of an entangled pair of photons, and then the information is teleported to the other distant entangled photon and is read by the recipient.

In essence, teleportation in this instance can be thought of as a kind of communication, where a qubit, or unit of quantum information, can be transported from one location to another, without having to move a physical particle along with it.

Consider a special operations mission where a soldier is behind enemy lines. To exfiltrate information to his or her command post in a friendly area, the soldier operates a small handheld teleportation exfiltration device, which will allow data and images to be securely teleported back to the command post.

According to Meyers, the team believes that the teleportation exfiltration approach will be successful between mobile assets over long distances at high speeds, just as their quantum ghost-imaging achievements are leading to a new generation of battlefield imagers.

“The ARL teleportation achievements are expected to be the basis for new types of Army mobile information teleportation networks for battlefield enhanced situational awareness and security,” said Meyers. “This research will benefit future soldiers by helping provide the Army with battlefield information teleportation networks that will be both cybersecure and fast.”

In addition, the method is being developed to be robust for adverse military environments with turbulence and obscurants.

“The success in achieving quantum teleportation over long distances through an obscured battlefield is difficult, but future mobile ad-hoc information teleportation networks can give the future Army exponential advantages in cyber security, speed and bandwidth,” Meyers said.

Meyers stated that the field of teleportation is advancing rapidly, and that despite the challenges that may lie ahead, he and his team see no significant roadblocks and expect more advances in their research that has the potential to enhance the way soldiers carry out their missions on the battlefield.

By Jenna Brady, ARL Public Affairs
Follow Armed with Science on Facebook and Twitter!

———-

Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DOD website.

This entry was posted in Articles, Cyber Security and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • http://myindigolives.wordpress.com/ Ellie K

    I understand how a qubit, (or a bunch of quibits that form a quantum image) are transported from one location to another, without needing physical particles to “carry” them along. That’s why this is referred to as information teleportation. Well, that’s my understanding ;o) I also gather that the entangled photon pairs, one at the origin and the other at the destination, provide the means for the quantum images to (very quickly!) make their journey from physically distant sender to recipient.

    One question, please? The post says that secure teleportation is possible over optical fiber or through free-space. Is one better, e.g. less error-prone (lossy?) or faster, than the other?

  • Heraldo Hannity Cooper

    how many aliens does it take to screw in a entangled photon?