Finding Space: The Karen Nyberg Story

I’m going to go on the record and say it: astronauts have the best jobs.

I mean really, you get to do what you love, in a unique environment, trained to do a great number of things and this is your view:

The Adriatic Sea, October 18, from Karen Nyberg's Twitter.  (Photo provided by AstroKarenN Twitter account)

A picture of the Adriatic Sea taken from space, Oct. 18, 2014. (Karen Nyberg courtesy photo)

Yes, being an astronaut has to be one of the greatest things a person can be, but it’s not just about the title.  It’s not for the fame and glory of being a space walker.  It’s more than that.

Of all the astronauts I’ve ever met, I’ve never met one who was unkind.  Or unfriendly.  Or unintelligent.  Or unsympathetic.  Quite the opposite.  They’re smart, interesting, patient, compassionate, charming, incredible people.  Is it because the people chosen to be astronauts are naturally that way, or does the job beget the geniality?

I think, perhaps, that it’s a little of both.

Photo: Apples and oranges? Astronauts Karen Nyberg and Luca Parmitano float around with some fruit on board the International Space Station. (NASA courtesy photo/Released)

Apples and oranges? Astronauts Karen Nyberg and Luca Parmitano float around with some fruit on board the International Space Station. (NASA courtesy photo/Released)

Astronauts represent, quite literally, the best humanity has to offer.  No matter what race, no matter what nationality, no matter what religion, they are all, indelibly, the people we should aspire to become. They give us hope for the future, because astronauts show us, everyday, why space matters.

Dr. Karen Nyberg is a career scientist.  On her second trip to the International Space Station, she served as a flight engineer for the crew of Expedition 37.

From the floating, sci-fi like SPHERES, to the science and research on the human body in space, to discovering better stabilizers for household goods, the astronauts in space are keeping busy up there to help make life down here easier, safer and more effective.

Karen’s story, and her experience, serve as a window for what we could be, and what science is about to become.

This is her story.


Photos and additional footage provided by NASA

———-
Jessica L. Tozer is a blogger for DoDLive and Armed with Science.  She is an Army veteran and an avid science fiction fan, both of which contribute to her enthusiasm for science and technology in the military.

Follow Armed with Science on Facebook and Twitter!

———-

Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DOD website.

This entry was posted in Articles, DoDLive Science, Space, Space Matters, Videos and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.