Mood Tracker App Available on Android

Dr. Greg Gahm, director of T2 and Dr. Tammy Crowder, chief of staff at the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) check out the T2 Mood Tracker App using the link from the QR code. (Photo by Dr. Anita Brown, T2)

Dr. Greg Gahm, director of T2 and Dr. Tammy Crowder, chief of staff at the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) check out the T2 Mood Tracker App using the link from the QR code. (Photo by Dr. Anita Brown, T2)

The National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), a DCoE component center, developed a FREE smart phone mobile application that makes it easier for servicemembers and veterans to track their emotional health after deployments.

The T2 Mood Tracker helps users monitor trends of emotions and behaviors from therapy, medication, daily experiences and changes in their environment such as work and home.

“Therapists and physicians often have to rely on patient recall when trying to gather information about symptoms over the previous weeks or months. Research has shown that information collected after the fact, especially about mood, tends to be inaccurate,” said Dr. Perry Bosmajian, a T2 psychologist. “This application can improve the quality of the treatments for the provider and the patient. The best record of an experience is when it’s recorded at the time and place it happens.”

Be among the first to download the T2 Mood Tracker! The application is available for smart phones using the Android operating system. A version for the iPhone is expected to be available early next year.

The mood measuring app was recently recognized as a winner in the “Apps for the Army” (A4A) application development challenge, check out the post here.

Whether you’re a servicemember, veteran or family member, your psychological health is important. For more information about T2 Mood Tracker, go to www.t2health.org/apps.

Tell us what you think about this new mobile app by adding a comment below. If you think this cool technology is worth sharing (and we hope you do) click the share/save buttons above, and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter!

Check out these screenshots:

Mood Tracker Screenshot

Mood Tracker Screenshot

Mood Tracker ScreenshotMood Tracker Screenshot

This post was shared with us by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCOE). The DCoE Blog features information on psychological health and traumatic brain injury issues as well as personal stories and reflections from people within the military community on these topics.

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  • http://stevenswood.com/ mendocino luxury hotels

    Great news dude! I first hear that sound Mood tracker tools now available. Keep up coming! 

  • Sue

    I find this app just so so … I like the indicators, but the graph is difficult to read and there’s no export function so I can’t share it with my team. I also don’t like that I can’t see a date on the form when I complete it so I can’t go backward to catch up. The only real benefit is the time i take to reflect on my mood. Otherwise, a paper tracker has more practical benefits.